AUTOCAR HEAVY DUTY (CLASS 8) TRUCKS

"Mama said little Danny's not doing too good in school said he keeps talkin' about his daddy that he hardly knows, teacher said that he just sits at his desk and draws pictures of trucks, I guess I know what that means and what it shows"

(from "Roll Truck Roll" written by Tommy Collins (1966))



WHAT WEARY DESK JOCKEY HASN'T SURREPTITIOUSLY DREAMT ABOUT TRADING PLACES WITH THE NOMADIC LONG HAUL TRUCKER -- AMERICA'S MODERN DAY COWBOY. FORTUNATELY THOSE OF US THAT WORK IN A CUBICAL - NOT THE CAB OF A PETERBILT -- CAN STILL THROW SOME DAVE DUDLEY INTO THE DISC PLAYER AND HEAD OVER TO THE LOCAL TRUCK STOP FOR A CUP A JOE.


"Pour me another cup of coffee, for it is the best in the land, i'll put a nickel in the jukebox, and play that Truck Drivin' Man"

(from "Truck Drivin Man" written by Terry Fell (1962))






HISTORIC MARQUEES

AUTOCAR



Autocar is the oldest continuously produced vehicle nameplate in the United States. The company was formed in 1897 as the Pittsburgh Motor Car Company by brothers Louis S. Clark and John S. Clark. The first vehicles produced were a gas-powered tricycle and a small auto dubbed the "Pittsburger". In 1899, the company was relocated to Ardmore, PA and the name was changed to Autocar. In 1900, Autocar produced the Type V Runabout, an automobile with 2 cylinder engine. In 1907, Autocar added truck production. In 1911, Autocar ceased producing motorized tricycles and cars to focus on trucks exclusively. Manufactured starting in 1907, was the Type XVIII, a one ton truck with an 18.1 hp 2 cylinder motor, 3 speed transmission, and 85 inch wheelbase. Also produced was the similar Type XXI, a two ton truck with a 97 inch wheelbase. These models were produced until 1926. In 1919, larger models (up to five tons) were also manufactured. In 1926, Autocar marketed a new series of trucks up to 7 1/2 tons with four and six cylinder motors. In 1936, Autocar introduced the UD series. Autocar was heavily involved in production of trucks for WW II starting in 1940. In 1953, Autocar was purchased by White Motor Company of Exton, PA. Autocar was a top nameplate for White, which was marketed mainly for specialized applications such as logging, mining and construction. White Motor Company distributed Autocar, Freightliner, and Western Star trucks. This group was known as the "Big Four". The Autocar nameplate was acquired by Volvo in the early 1980s, as part of their acquisition of White Trucks. Volvo marketed cement and dump trucks under the Autocar nameplate until 2001. Volvo acquired Mack Trucks in December, 2000. At the time, Mack like Autocar was strong in heavy construction trucks. As a result of the Mack acquisition, the U.S Department of Justice mandated that Volvo offload Autocar, which they did to Grand Vehicle Works, in 2001. GVW currently markets refuse trucks under the Autocar nameplate, their website is here.

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